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‘Opa mariwme.
‘opa mari ‘öme
Hello mother GEN/1
Hello, my mother.

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‘Opa ‘arawme.
‘opa ‘ara ‘öme
Hello son GEN/1
Hello, my son.

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Hwa ‘umuwma, mariwme.
hö’a ‘umu ‘öma, mari ‘öme
learn ‘umu 1, mother GEN/1
I’m learning Umu, my mother.

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‘Opawu ‘arawme.
’öpa ‘ö’u ‘ara ‘öme
good 3, son GEN/1
That is good, my son.

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‘Ulöravna jja, mariwme?
‘urö ‘öra vöna jöja, mari ‘öme
name man there what, mother GEN/1
What is that man’s name, my mother?

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‘Ul Kij wu, ‘arawme.
‘urö Kijö ‘ö’u ‘ara ‘öme
name Kij 3, son GEN/1
His name is Kij, my son.

‘Opa, the usual greeting, is appropriate for any hour of day or night. Good morning and good evening are not true Umu terms. ‘Opa is also used for leave-taking. Usually the greeting is said first, then the person’s name or title.

‘Opa & ‘opawuit is good, is also used where such statements would be appropriate in English. In this sense, both are interchangeable.

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‘Opamariwo.
‘opa mari ‘ö’o.
good mother GEN/3
His mother is good.

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‘Opawu wra.
‘opa ‘ö’u ‘öra
good 3 man
The man is good. He is a good man.

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‘Opa’umu.
‘opa ‘umu
good language
Umu is a good language.

Any woman old enough to be one’s mother may be addressed mariwme. She may call any young man ‘arawme. Unmarried women use the term when speaking to younger men or boys – those young enough to be her son.

Older people are often reluctant to give their names. They prefer using a social title or having someone else tell their name. Younger people are used to giving their names at school and work.

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